Newsletters

Tax Alerts
Tax Briefing(s)

The IRS has announced the launch of two new online tools to help families verify, manage and monitor monthly payments of child tax credits under the American Rescue Plan Act (ARP) ( P.L. 117-2). These are in addition to the Non-filer Sign-up tool announced last week, which helps families register for child tax credits. The tools are both available through the Update Portal at https://www.irs.gov/credits-deductions/child-tax-credit-update-portal.


Partnerships, S corporations, and U.S. persons with interests in foreign partnerships may rely on transition relief from penalties for tax years beginning in 2021 with respect to new Schedules K-2 and K-3.


The Departments of the Treasury, Labor, and Health and Human Services (the Departments), have issued interim final rules and identical proposed regulations to implement provisions of the No Surprises Act.


The IRS has proposed regulations that would amend the rules for filing electronically and affects persons required to file partnership returns, corporate income tax returns, unrelated business income tax returns, withholding tax returns, certain information returns, registration statements, disclosure statements, notifications, actuarial reports, and certain excise tax returns.


Secretary of the Treasury Janet L.Yellen addressed the support for a global minimum tax for corporations at a press conference at the close of the G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors Meetings, on July 11, 2021.


The IRS has provided a procedure for making elections and revocations under Act Sec. 2303(e) of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) ( P.L. 116-136) for taxpayers with a net operating loss (NOL) for any tax year beginning in 2018, 2019, or 2020, all or a portion of which consists of a farming loss (farming loss NOLs). The procedure is effective on the date of its release, June 30, 2021.


The IRS has provided answers to questions that certain transportation companies may have regarding Treasury grants and related taxes.


The IRS reminded taxpayers that their website (www.irs.gov) provides millions of visitors with the answers they need to fit their busy summer schedules.


It is never too early to begin planning for the 2016 filing season, the IRS has advised in seven new planning tips published on its website. Although the current filing season has just ended, there are steps that taxpayers can take now to avoid a tax bill when April 2016 rolls around. For example, the IRS stated that taxpayers can adjust their withholding, take stock of any changes in income or family circumstances, maintain accurate tax records, and more, in order to reduce the probability of a surprise tax bill when the next filing season arrives.


A major repair to a business vehicle is usually deductible in the year of the repair as a "maintenance and repair" cost if your business uses the actual expense method of deducting vehicle expenses. If your business vehicle is written off under the standard mileage rate method, your repair and maintenance costs are assumed to be built into that standard rate and no further deduction is allowed.

In many cases, employees can elect to reduce their salary and contribute the amounts to a retirement plan. These plans include 401(k) cash or deferred arrangements, 403(b) tax-sheltered annuities, eligible Code Sec. 457 deferred compensation plans of state and local governments and tax-exempt entities, simple retirement accounts, and plans for self-employed persons such as a SEP individual retirement account (SEP IRA).

Parents of a child under age 13 can take a tax credit for child care expenses to enable them to work. The credit can be taken for care of two or more children. Child care expenses are amounts you paid for someone to come to your home, for care at the home of a day care provider, and for care at a day care center.

In a final session, Congress approved a $45.1 billion package of tax extenders and other tax breaks during the night of December 8-9. The Tax Relief and Health Care Act of 2006 (H.R. 6111) renews many valuable - but temporary - tax breaks for individuals and businesses, including the state and local sales tax deduction, the higher education tuition deduction and employer tax incentives. The new law also extends some energy tax breaks, makes Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) more attractive and creates new tax incentives.

Only 50 percent of the cost of meals is generally deductible. A meal deduction is customarily allowed when the meal is business related and incurred in one of two instances: