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The IRS has reminded taxpayers who are earning income from selling goods and/or providing services that they may receive Form 1099-K, Payment Card and Third-Party Network Transactions, for payment card transactions and third-party payment network transactions of more than $600 for the year.


Many taxpayers may be surprised in early 2023 when they receive a Form 1099-K, Payment Card and Third-Party Network Transactions, to report income earned in the “gig economy” or in sales of goods and services through certain internet sites. The number of taxpayers receiving the forms is expected to skyrocket because the threshold for reporting payments made through third-party processors has plummeted.


Beginning with their 2021 tax years, partnerships with "items of international tax relevance" must file Schedule K-2, Partners’ Distributive Share Items—International, and Schedule K-3, Partner’s Share of Income, Deductions, Credits, etc.—International.


The Tax Court set aside Notice 2017-10, 2017-4 I.R.B. 544, while adjudicating a series of consolidated cases involving limited liability companies (LLCs) and conservation easements, because it was improperly issued by the IRS without meeting the notice and comment requirements under the Administrative Procedure Act (APA).


The Department of the Treasury outlined how the Inflation Reduction Act’s tax incentives will support the building of an equitable clean energy economy.


The IRS-Criminal Investigation (IRS-CI) has released its Fiscal Year 2022 Annual Report. The report details statistics, important partnerships and significant criminal enforcement actions from IRS-CI, the criminal investigative arm of the IRS, for the past fiscal year, which began October 1, 2021 and ended September 30, 2022. Over 2,550 criminal investigations, the identification of more than $31 billion from tax fraud and financial crimes, and a 90.6 percent conviction rate are just a few highlights of the report.


Changes made by the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 ( P.L. 117-169) are reflected in draft forms and instructions


The Internal Revenue Service is estimating the tax gap on tax years 2014-2016 to be $496 billion, an increase of more than $58 billion from the prior estimate.


Former Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Charles Rettig used his farewell message to highlight the work the agency’s workforce did during his four-year term as commissioner, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, but also during more normal times.


It is never too early to begin planning for the 2016 filing season, the IRS has advised in seven new planning tips published on its website. Although the current filing season has just ended, there are steps that taxpayers can take now to avoid a tax bill when April 2016 rolls around. For example, the IRS stated that taxpayers can adjust their withholding, take stock of any changes in income or family circumstances, maintain accurate tax records, and more, in order to reduce the probability of a surprise tax bill when the next filing season arrives.


A major repair to a business vehicle is usually deductible in the year of the repair as a "maintenance and repair" cost if your business uses the actual expense method of deducting vehicle expenses. If your business vehicle is written off under the standard mileage rate method, your repair and maintenance costs are assumed to be built into that standard rate and no further deduction is allowed.

In many cases, employees can elect to reduce their salary and contribute the amounts to a retirement plan. These plans include 401(k) cash or deferred arrangements, 403(b) tax-sheltered annuities, eligible Code Sec. 457 deferred compensation plans of state and local governments and tax-exempt entities, simple retirement accounts, and plans for self-employed persons such as a SEP individual retirement account (SEP IRA).

Parents of a child under age 13 can take a tax credit for child care expenses to enable them to work. The credit can be taken for care of two or more children. Child care expenses are amounts you paid for someone to come to your home, for care at the home of a day care provider, and for care at a day care center.

In a final session, Congress approved a $45.1 billion package of tax extenders and other tax breaks during the night of December 8-9. The Tax Relief and Health Care Act of 2006 (H.R. 6111) renews many valuable - but temporary - tax breaks for individuals and businesses, including the state and local sales tax deduction, the higher education tuition deduction and employer tax incentives. The new law also extends some energy tax breaks, makes Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) more attractive and creates new tax incentives.

Only 50 percent of the cost of meals is generally deductible. A meal deduction is customarily allowed when the meal is business related and incurred in one of two instances: